Donald Trump Accuses Clintons Of ‘Suiciding’ Vince Foster

Donald Trump says that the Clintons are responsible for the suicide of Vince Foster
Donald Trump has sent the mainstream media into a frenzy after publicly declaring that former top aide to the Clintons, Vince Foster, was probably “suicided” by the elite. 

His comments have re-ignited the story in the mainstream media, upsetting Hillary who has relied on it being buried on obscure conspiracy websites.
Alternative news blogger and activist Shepard Ambellas remarked in a recent podcast that Trump’s repeated references to various conspiracies are rocking the mainstream establishment to their very core.
Donald isn’t just blowing hot air.  His claim that Vince Foster was murdered holds merit as website WND has uncovered information that proves the Clintons covered-up evidence of foul play. reports:
Less than three months ago, WND reported a resignation letter surfaced from the lead investigator in independent counsel Robert Fiske’s investigation of the Foster case, Miguel Rodriguez, outlining evidence of his charge that the case was fixed.
Thirteen years ago, WND reported Rodriguez, an assistant U.S. attorney, made an audio recording in which he charged the suicide ruling was predetermined, the crime scene was altered and major newspaper editors killed stories by reporters pursuing the truth.
“This whole notion of [Fiske and Starr] doing an honest investigation is laughable,” Rodriguez says in the tape.
In his resignation letter, Rodriquez refers to photographs showing a wound on Foster’s neck that was not mentioned in Starr’s official government report.
The obvious questions: How could a suicide victim be found with two wounds, a .38-caliber gunshot into the mouth that exited through his head and another wound on the right side of his neck that one of the paramedics described as a small-caliber bullet hole? And why would the government investigators go to great lengths to cover it up?
National Archives discovery
In 2009, two documents created by Rodriguez were discovered in the National Archives by researchers Hugh Turley and Patrick Knowlton.
But Knowlton was not just any amateur researcher. He was a grand jury witness who happened to be in Fort Marcy Park the day Foster died and noticed discrepancies that were never addressed by Starr’s report.
Allan Favish, a Los Angeles attorney who took a Freedom of Information Act case all the way to the Supreme Court seeking access to photographs of Foster’s body as it lay in the park, said he started looking into the case shortly after Foster’s death in 1993.
It was Favish who brought the National Archives discoveries by Turley and Knowlton to the attention of WND.
“It all started in the mid-1990s, not too long after Foster’s death, and I saw on the Internet, which was very unsophisticated at the time, some people posting things about the death,” Favish told WND. “Hugh Turley was involved very early on along with Knowlton.”
Rodriguez’s resignation letter to Starr, dated Jan. 17, 1995, says he was quitting because evidence was being overlooked in a rush to judgment in favor of suicide and closing the grand-jury investigation.
In the audio recording, Rodriguez said the accepted verdict, that Foster killed himself at Ft. Marcy Park near Washington, was predetermined by a “higher authority” at the start of the investigation. Rodriguez noted he did extensive interviews with major newspapers, including the New York Times, that were never published.
“All I know is that things did not happen the way Fiske says that they happened, and the reports don’t support what Fiske said,” Rodriguez stated. “There is nothing consistent with [Foster] committing that kind of violent act at all.”
Rodriguez, who was hired by Starr in 1994 to lead his grand jury investigation, is now an assistant U.S. attorney in Sacramento, California.
He was no conservative, wrote London Telegraph reporter Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in his book, “The Secret Life of Bill Clinton.”
“He had no ideological investment in the matter,” Evans-Pritchard wrote. “Indeed, when he arrived from California with his ponytail, his earring, and his leather jackets, there were comments among the hard-liners that Kenneth Starr had gone too far in his efforts to recruit Democrats, liberals, and ethnic minorities to his team.”
The recording was made public by Knowlton and his attorney John Clarke.
Clarke told WND he could not divulge how Knowlton acquired the tapes but noted that by publishing the recording, he was putting his career on the line.
“If I were to put out ginned up tapes of an assistant U.S. attorney, they would revoke my license immediately,” he said. “It’s probably a criminal offense.”
See what the players themselves said:
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